FAQ's

Registration Questions

  • I accidentily registered for the wrong race (i.e. duathlon instead of the triathlon). How can I fix it?

    1. Click here to go to the Account Tab on TriRegistration.com.

    2. If you are not already logged in, it will take you to the login screen and ask for your email address and password that you used when you registered.

    2a. If you did not create an account when you registered, use the Register new account link on the Login page to create an account using the same email address that you used when you registered.

    2b. If you forgot your password, use the I forgot my password link to reset it.

    3. Once logged in, select yourself in the Racers With This Account grid to populate the Upcoming Registrations grid with the events that you are registered for.

    4. In the Upcoming Registrations grid, click on the registration that needs to be modified.

    5. In the Transfer Options for Selected Registration grid, click on the Select button on the row with the Intra_Event transfer type.

    6. On the Transfer Options page, click on the race that you wish to transfer to. The cost to transfer will be indicated next to each race. Lateral transfers are generally free, but you must pay any price difference to upgrade.

    7. On the Payment page, enter your initials to agree to the terms and click the Complete Registration button if there is no charge or the PayPal button to pay the transfer fees.

    Click here to watch a video of how to do this.

  • I cannot make it to the race I signed up for. Can I transfer to another race?

    1. Click here to go to the Account Tab on TriRegistration.com.

    2. If you are not already logged in, it will take you to the login screen and ask for your email address and password that you used when you registered.

    2a. If you did not create an account when you registered, use the Register new account link on the Login page to create an account using the same email address that you used when you registered.

    2b. If you forgot your password, use the I forgot my password link to reset it.

    3. Once logged in, select yourself in the Racers With This Account grid to populate the Upcoming Registrations grid with the events that you are registered for.

    4. In the Upcoming Registrations grid, click on the registration that you wish to transfer out of.

    5. The Transfer Options for Selected Registration grid will show you all transfer options that are currently available for the race you are registered for. Some events will not have transfer options.  In this case you will want to ignore the Intra_Event transfer as it is strictly to switch between the races at the same event (on same day).
    The most common transfer types in this scenario are Race_Credit and Next_Year.
    Race Credit gives you a credit of the amount you paid (excluding transaction fees) minus the transfer fee as a credit on your account. The next time you register for any event by that same race organization, your credit will automatically be deducted from your amount due.
    Next Year requires you to pay a transfer fee and moves your registration to the following year's race. This option is generally only available for races without a race credit option and is usually available close to the race date. With this option, you will have to either buy a one day USAT membership or renew your annual membership so that it is still valid on the date of the following year's race.

    6. Select the Transfer Option you wish to take.

    6a. In the case of Race Credit, it will tell you how much you will get credited and if you agree. Once you agree, it will issue the credit. Now you can select yourself in the Racers grid on the Account page and see your credit in the Race Credits grid.

    6b.In the case of Next Year, you basically go through the registration process for the new event.

    Click here to watch a video of how to take a race credit.

  • My personal info is incorrect (name misspelled, birthdate wrong, etc.). How do I fix it?

    1. Click here to go to the Account Tab on TriRegistration.com.

    2. If you are not already logged in, it will take you to the login screen and ask for your email address and password that you used when you registered.

    2a. If you did not create an account when you registered, use the Register new account link on the Login page to create an account using the same email address that you used when you registered.

    2b. If you forgot your password, use the I forgot my password link to reset it.

    3. Once logged in, select yourself in the Racers With This Account grid.

    4. Click the Edit button to update your personal info. The Edit button is the pencil at the bottom of the Racer grid between the + and garbage can.

    5. Change the incorrect information and click the Submit button to save.

    Click here to watch a video of how to do this.

  • I am trying to register but cannot get past the USAT validation. Help!

    One Day ($15):

    One Day memberships are validated based on 3 things:

    1. Membership ID - This is the code that USAT gives you when you purchase a one day membership. To ensure that it is correct, copy and paste it from the USAT website or the email that USAT sends you after the purchase to the USAT Number field on the registration page on TriRegistration.com. This is important because an l looks similar to an I and so forth, so if you type it in, you could make an error.

    2. Email Address - You must use the exact same email address on TriRegistration.com and the USAT website. When you select to purchase a One Day Membership, we pass the email address to USAT for you, but some people actually change it and wonder why their One Day Membership ID doesn't validate.

    3. USAT Event ID - You don't actually see this field as we send it to USAT in the background, but it specifies the event that you are purchasing a One Day Membership for. That One Day Membership ID can only be used for that event and no other. USAT doesn't allow transferring it if you don't use it either. Once it is purchased, the only credit you can get is towards a USAT annual membership.

    Common Errors Include:

    1. Error validating member number - Generally you get this error when you don't enter anything at all for the USAT number and try to continue. Though people has received this error by entering One Day, n/a, Not known, etc.

    2. License Not Found - This error occurs when a number is entered, but it is incorrect. This even occurs if a valid annual membership is entered, but One Day is selected as the membership type. Copying and pasting your one day membership id from USAT's website to TriRegistration.com should prevent this error.

    3. Invalid Event - This error occurs when a valid number is entered, but it is for a different event. One Day memberships are only good for the event you purchased it for and no other event, even if you transferred your registration or did not attend the original event. Contact USAT directly if you have any questions or issues with your one day membership.

    Annual ($50):

    Annual memberships are validated based on 4 things:

    1. Membership ID - This is the ID that USAT gives you when you purchase an annual membership. To ensure that it is correct, copy and paste it from the USAT website or the email that USAT sends you after the purchase to the USAT Number field on the registration page on TriRegistration.com.

    2. Last Name - You must use the exact same last name to register as is on your annual license record with USAT. Log into your account with USAT to double check this.

    3. Birthdate - You would be surprised how many people mistype their birthdate either when registering or when purchasing their annual membership. This must be an exact match. Log into your account with USAT to double check this.

    4. Race Date - Your annual membership must not expire before the date of the race you are registering for. It doesn't matter if it is currently valid. Sorry, you can't renew later either. Renewing your annual membership extends the expiration date one year from it's current expiration date, not the date you renew or the event date. You will get a full year added on, so go ahead and renew.

    Common Errors Include:

    1. Membership end date is less than event date - This means that your USAT membership will expire before the event, so you must renew now in order to register. It doesn't matter if it is currently valid. Sorry, you can't renew later either. Renewing your annual membership extends the expiration date one year from it's current expiration date, not the date you renew or the event date. You will get a full year added on, so go ahead and renew.

    2. Last name does not match - This means that the last name on records is not an exact match for the USAT annual license number that you entered. Double check BOTH your last name and the USAT Number that you entered, as a typo on either could cause this error. Log into your account with USAT to double check your USAT Number and how your last name is entered.

    3. Error validating member number - Generally you get this error when you don't enter anything at all for the USAT number and try to continue. Though people has received this error by entering One Day, n/a, Not known, etc.

    4. Membership info not found - Generally you get this error when the USAT Number you entered isn't a valid USAT Number at all. You may have a typo. Double check it with USAT directly.

    5. Birthdate does not match - The USAT Number and last name match, so you either entered your birthdate wrong on TriRegistration.com or you have it wrong on your USAT record.


  • How do I create a TriRegistration Account?

    1. Click here to go to Account Registration on TriRegistration.com.

    2. Enter the email address that you used for your existing registrations and/or intend to use for future registrations.

    3. Enter and confirm your password.

    4. Enter the characters in the Captcha and click the Register button.

    5. Go to your email account and click on the confirmation link in the email the system sends to you. If you don't get it immediately, check your spam filter or junk mailbox.

  • What can I do with a TriRegistration Account?

    To see how to create an account and all that you can do with it, click here to watch a video on the Account system.
  • How do I register without logging in?

    1. You must enter an email address on the Sign In page even if you do not wish to log in or create an account as we need to be able to email you a registration confirmation and updates regarding the event.

    2. On the Password page, simply click the Continue without logging in link to register without logging in (as shown in picture).

  • How do I register without creating an account?

    1. You must enter an email address on the Sign In page even if you do not wish to log in or create an account as we need to be able to email you a registration confirmation and updates regarding the event.

    2. To register without creating an account, simply do not enter a password on the Participant screen (see picture).


  • What can I do on the TriRegistration website?

    To see the great features of the TriRegistration.com website, click here to watch a video on the system.

General Questions

  • What is a triathlon?

    A triathlon consists of three disciplines. Swim, bike and run, usually in that order.

  • What is a duathlon?

    A duathlon consists of two disciplines. Run and bike, usually in the order of run, bike, run.

  • What are the typical triathlon distances?

    Most triathlons are what is referred to as Sprint distance (a.k.a. Short distance). Sprint is not an exact distance, but is usually about a ¼ mile swim, 10 mile bike, and 3 mile run. For duathlons, a 1 mile run is typically substituted for the swim. Each discipline can vary up to 50% and most sprint distance races will vary from those exact distances depending on the particular race venue. Most triathletes are happy racing Sprint triathlons and having grudge matches with their local friends.  It is a great way to stay in shape and local races have a great social environment.  Some athletes, however, crave longer distances.  How long you can go is only limited by the amount of time you have to train. 

    The most common longer distance beyond the Sprint Triathlon is the International Distance Triathlon (a.k.a Intermediate distance).  USAT defines Intermediate distance as a race with 2 of the 3 segments of the race within the following parameters:  swim (.7-1.2 miles), bike (18.7-31 miles), run (4-8 miles).  Please note that an Olympic Distance Triathlon, which is an exact distance as specified below, is also an International Distance Triathlon as it falls within that distance range, but the inverse is not always true. 

    MultiRace hosts International Distance Triathlons with most of our Sprint Distance races so we have a little something for everyone.  Some are Olympic Distance and some are not.  If a race is an Olympic Distance, we will call it that, otherwise we'll use the term International.

    Many longer triathlon distances are well defined. These distances are:

    Full Iron (a.k.a. Ironman): 2.4 mile swim, 112 mile bike, 26.2 mile run. The term Ultra distance also encompasses the Full Iron distance but also includes races that are not the exact Full Iron distance.

    Half Iron (a.k.a. ½ Ironman, 70.3): 1.2 mile swim, 56 mile bike, 13.1 mile run. MultiRace currently hosts 2 half iron triathlons.  In February, we have la Habana Triathlon in Havana, Cuba and in November,  Miami Man. This is the longest and largest triathlon in all of South Florida and draws participants from all 50 states and dozens of foreign countries. It also includes an International distance triathlon for those that aren’t quite ready to tackle the Half Iron Distance. The term “long distance” also encompasses the Half Iron distance but also includes races that are not the exact Half Iron distance.

    Olympic: 1500 meter (.93 mile) swim, 40k (24.8 mile) bike, 10k (6.2 miles) run. The term International distance and Intermediate distance also encompasses the Olympic distance but also includes races that are not the exact Olympic distance. Also note that the term Ironman Triathlon is trademarked by the World Triathlon Corporation, therefore you will not see many other race promoters using the term Ironman as it is not worth the legal battle. However, most triathletes will use the term when referring to Full Iron and Half Iron distance events. 

  • Do you really think I can finish a triathlon?

    Yes, I do (though the wizards in the legal department would like me to tell you to check with your doctor before beginning any exercise regimen). If you’ve reached this site, the chances are pretty good that you have the motivation that could get you to the finish of a triathlon. You’re interested in racing, endurance and fitness. As long as you pick a triathlon that’s suited realistically to your abilities, you can finish. Even if your goal is a longer distance, you should always start out at a local sprint distance triathlon to practice and learn the ropes. All MultiRace events have a MultiRace 101 clinic the day before the race that covers all you need to know and allows you to ask as many questions as you like. Even if you’ve completed a few races, the clinic is highly recommended.

  • What triathlon distance is right for me?

    Always start by doing a sprint distance race regardless of the distance of your goal race.

  • Do I need to have a strong background in one of the events?

    Not necessarily. While you will encounter athletes who swam in high school meets or ran cross-country, many new triathletes are approaching these events for the first time. 

  • How much time will I need to train for a triathlon?

    The amount of time necessary to train for a triathlon is dependent on your goals. The important question to ask is "do I just want to finish or do I want to be competitive?" Previous experience and training in the three disciplines will also make a difference. It is important to train your weakness, in an attempt to be proficient at swim, bike, run, and transitions. A sprint distance triathlon can be successfully completed in as few as four hours per week over a six-week training period. When training for a Full Iron Distance event, one should allow at least six months and 20 hours per week. For those preparing to race at an elite level for a Full Iron Distance race, training is a full time job. It is important to set your priorities in life and decide what place triathlon will occupy.

  • What is the essential equipment?

    • Goggles
    • Swim Cap (provided by race organizer)
    • Bike
    • Helmet
    • Running Shoes
    • Race Bib.

    For both men and women, there are trisuits, a one piece that has padding in the saddle of the shorts and the optional built-in sports bra on the top.  This is also available in a separate top and bottom, with a thin pad in the saddle that dries faster than the pad in traditional bike shorts. The material is like that of a swimsuit, pulling moisture away from the body and drying quickly. 

    You can dress for speed or modesty but keep in mind, the distance you are competing should be considered.  If you are doing a sprint distance triathlon, you will not need to worry about padding in shorts as much as someone who is competing in the international, half or full distance triathlon.  

    Sun exposure, temperature, wind, distance, terrain, these are all things that must be considered when you decide what to wear on race day.  Remember that nudity is not allowed in transition. Long races will typically have gender specific locations (i.e. bathrooms) if you have to change during transition. Some people also get away with tying a towel around themselves.

    Swim Gear Checklist: Swimsuit, Goggles, Anti-Fog for goggles, Swim Cap (race organizers will supply one and you have to wear that one as they are color coded)
    During cooler weather: Wetsuit (78 degrees or less water temp), Cooking oil spray or TriGlide (for wetsuit lubrication)

    Bike Gear Checklist: Cycling shoes, socks, cycling shorts, helmet, sunglasses, tire pump, C02 cartridge/delivery system, spare tire, water bottle, gloves, sunscreen, gel flask/gel packets

    Running Gear Checklist: Running shoes, speed laces, socks (optional), hat, sunglasses, sunscreen, race number belt, gel flask/gel packets

    Additional Items: Sandals, sunscreen, after-race clothing, and a camera! 

  • What is a race number belt?

    It is required that triathletes wear their race number on the front of their body (sometimes called a bib) during the run portion of a triathlon. Some athletes put on shorts and/or a t-shirt over their swimsuits after the swim and simply pin their bibs to their shorts or shirts before the race. For those athletes who race in their swimsuits (or tri suits), there is nothing to pin their bib to. They use a race belt, or tri-belt, which is a very simple stretchy band with two plastic prongs that hold a race number. As these athletes leave the transition zone for T2, they clip the belt (with the bib already attached) around their waist, and off they go! Your race number should always be on the front of your body.

  • What should I eat or drink for triathlons?

    Nutrition for triathlons will depend on the distance of your race, as well as your fitness, as that will affect how long you are racing.

    For a Sprint distance race, some people only drink water during the event running only on what they ate for breakfast. Others take Hammer Gel during one of their transitions. You will get a Hammer Gel in your race packet.

    For Olympic distance races Gatorade sports drink and Hammer Gel are both provided at the run water stations and contain enough nutrition to get most people through this distance. Do not attempt this distance on water alone! You should have training sessions that last for the same time or longer than this race where you will practice your nutrition to ensure that it works for you. Hiring a coach is suggested for optimal performance at this and longer distances.

    For Half-Iron or Full Iron events you will need a more substantial supply of calories. Aid stations are located on the bike courses as well as the run courses for events of this distance and have food such as oranges, bananas, cookies, etc. in addition to Gatorade sports drink and Hammer Gel. You should have a nutrition plan for long distances such as this. Hiring a coach is highly recommended! Nutrition choices for any length of event should be something that is palatable and that you look forward to. Caloric needs will vary based on your body weight and level of exertion. Average need is 200 - 500 calories per hour. Electrolyte Replacement is another important subject; we recommend Endurolytes by Hammer Gel. Being aware of race conditions and consuming plenty of water or sports drink is also vital. The best advice is to experiment in training and find what works best for you.

  • How do I register for a triathlon race?

    For events in South Florida, visit our homepage www.multirace.com and choose an event and then you can register online. Some events fill-up quick, so register early.

  • Where do I get training guidelines?

    There are some free training programs that can be found on the web using a Google search. There are also several triathlon books that you can review at your local book store. MultiRace has coaches who frequent our races that have created beginner training plans offered for free. Click on the training plan link on our homepage at www.multirace.com. Hiring a coach is recommended for optimal performance.

  • Where can I find a map of the race course?

    Swim/Bike/Run course maps have links on each race’s corresponding web page.

  • What is in a race packet?

    The packet will include races numbers (for your bike, to wear while running, and usually to put on your bike helmet), colored swim cap (which designates your swim wave), race t-shirt (usually good for after the race, not during), race information, and other gifts. If possible, it is always better to get your race packet the day before the race to avoid the morning rush, especially if you have questions about the race. Always try to get all of your question answered prior to race day to reduce your anxiety.

  • What do I eat the night before the race?

    This is highly individualized choice and there are many articles you can find about this subject. As a general guideline, eat a high carb dinner about fourteen hours before race time and drink fluids. Eat foods that you have eaten during training – this is not the time to try a new meal.

  • What if I can’t sleep in anticipation of the race?

    Rest is important, but don’t panic if you only get a few hours of sleep.  The excitement of the race has kept many triathletes from getting a relaxed night of sleep.  Since the sprint distance triathlon is a shorter race, you will have plenty of energy to get through it. 

  • Who will be in the triathlon?

    There will be a mix of elite triathletes, intermediate triathletes and those doing their first triathlon. You will see $10,000 triathlon bikes and $200 road, hybrid, and mountain bikes, along with a wide range of other equipment. Don’t worry about the other athletes and equipment; focus on completing your event. Every triathlete at the race has had their first race at some time, so they will generally be happy to answer any questions. MultiRace events draw a lot of first timers so you are not alone! 

  • When should I plan to arrive at the race site?

    To avoid the rush for important stops such as the bathrooms and any additional stress, it is beneficial to arrive 1.5 hours before race start. This should give you enough time to get body markings, set-up your transition area and complete warm-ups. Also, be aware that sometimes the event parking area is not directly next to the race start area – there may be a .25 to .50 mile walk or ride (this is when keeping your race gear in some type of backpack is helpful.) Remember that you must always wear your helmet when riding your bike at the race site, even before and after the race! You could get disqualified before the race even starts for not wearing your helmet. It is a very important rule for the safety of everyone.

  • What if something goes wrong in that Special Triathlon I’ve spent so much time preparing for?

    For some, understandably, a triathlon is a culmination of much dedication, preparation, training time, and family support. It’s a project, it’s a big deal, and you want it all to be worth it. But sometimes things go wrong out there, in the same way that it might rain on a long-planned outdoor wedding. The swim might not go as well as you expect. You might get a flat tire on the bike. You might experience unexpected cramping on the run. Triathlon is about the expected as well as the unexpected. The successful triathlete – you – earns that internal and external respect by taking whatever the day, the course and the competition hands you. You are also less likely to be disappointed if you compete in several events and don’t plan your entire year around a single event.

  • What is MultiRace’s refund/transfer policy?

    Refunds will NOT be issued after a registration has taken place, but under certain circumstances, race transfers can occur. There are no race transfers on race day for any MultiRace events, even if a registered athlete is a “no show” and a slot is available. Transfers are not permitted from athlete to athlete. Transfers out of a MultiRace owned event (no transfers to/from MultiRace timed events) must be completed at least 7 days prior the scheduled event and a fee will incur. A race transfer is defined as transferring an athlete’s registration to another race for any reason (injury, illness, unexpected calendar conflict, etc.). This policy has been implemented in fairness to all MultiRace participants to ensure that events start on time, for safety considerations, and is in accordance with USAT policy. No transfers will be allowed beyond this deadline. 

    If you are unable to compete in a race that you have signed up for in advance, you may take race credit for the amount you paid for the race minus an admin fee.  The admin fee varies based on the race and how long before the race you complete the credit process.  This credit can then be applied towards YOUR registration at any future MultiRace event and never expires.  To take a race credit, please find yourself on the participant list for the race that you no longer wish to be registered for and click the Change/Transfer link next to your name.

    Premier Race Events: Miami Man, TriMiami,  LasOlas Ft Lauderale Triathlon, and TriKeyWest entries can only be transferred to the premier race entry the following year. For instance, if you can not make the Miami Man 2016 event, you can transfer to the Miami Man 2017 event only. 

  • If I am unable to make the race, can I give my entry to a friend?

    No. If someone else races under your name and is injured, or causes an accident, that person will not be covered by any protection typically afforded to an athlete through the USA Triathlon sanction and insurance. Plus, if the athlete racing in your name causes injury or damage, you may be liable in part for those damages. If caught, both athletes will be banned from racing in any other USAT event.

  • What is the procedure for making a change to an entry?

    If you are unable to compete in a race that you have signed up for in advance, you may transfer your registration to another race (MultiRace owned events only, you cannot transfer to a MultiRace timed event).  .  To take a race credit, please find yourself on the participant list for the race that you no longer wish to be registered for and click the Change/Transfer link next to your name.

    Premier Race Events: Miami Man, TriMiami,  LasOlas Ft Lauderale Triathlon, and TriKeyWest entries can only be transferred to the premier race entry the following year. For instance, if you can not make the Miami Man 2016 event, you can transfer to the Miami Man 2017 event only.

  • If I meet the Clydesdale or Athena weight categories, do I have to race in those divisions?

    No. You can select to race as an age group athlete, or as a Clydesdale\Athena athlete.

  • What are body markings?

    There will be an area where volunteers or race officials will write your race number on your shoulders and thighs, along with your age on one calf. For the most part, these numbers will wash off with the first shower.

  • Is there a first timer category? Didn't you use to have a first timer's category?

    No, there is no longer a first timer category. It was eliminated as a category because of all of the confusion that it caused. 

  • Can you swim with the run number?

    Yes, some people pin it to their shorts and tuck it inside their shorts during the swim. 

  • How do I attach the run number while I am on the bike?

    You don’t. You should have it pre-pinned to an article of clothing that you are already wearing, or that you intend on putting on after you rack your bike in transition. We recommend using a race belt instead.

  • What will you get at registration?

    You will get 3 race numbers (run, bike, and helmet), a t-shirt, and a race packet that contains numerous goodies (i.e. Hammer Gel) and sponsor ads and promos.

  • My family is coming to see me, will they be able to see the swim? What about during the race and finish? Where is the best place for spectators to be?

    Yes, look at the online course maps and go to the venue the day before the race if you’d like to plan out the best spots for viewing. You can also just follow the crowd on race day. There are always plenty of great spots to view the race. Your spouse should also consider volunteering to get an up close and personal experience with the race while earning you future race credits. Email wsavoie@multirace.com if you want to volunteer for the race.

  • What are the cutoff times?

    Please see specific event pages for cut-off times.

  • Which Age Group will I participate in?

    Athletes will participate in the Age Group that coincides with their age at the end of the calendar year (12/31/16).
  • What is a "Premier" race?

    MultiRace has several races offered throughout the year.  While all of our races are unique, our premier events are destination races that draw athletes from all over the world to compete.  Those are Mack Cycle Miami Man, Mack Cycle TriMiami, City Bikes Las Olas Ft Lauderdale Triathlon and Tri Key West.  The transfer policy is different for these events as you can only defer to the following year.  You can not get race credit or transfer to a different race for these events.

Swim

  • Will the swim be a mass start?

    No, athletes will start in waves determined by their race division, gender and age. Please refer to posted wave schedule for each individual race. 

  • What is a 'wave'?

    The swim is organized by "waves" that is one or more division's start at specific times with 3-5 minutes in-between. Wave start times are posted at packet pickup. You must start in your wave according to rules or result in a time penalty. Waves are organized by swim cap color, so it is important for you to wear the swim cap given to you at packet pickup.

  • What about water quality?

    The water quality is tested prior to each race to ensure that the bacteria count is at safe levels as determined by the governmental agency in charge of that body of water.

  • Do I need to bring a swim cap?

    No. Swim caps will be provided in your race packet.

  • Do you have to wear the swim cap?

    Yes, you must wear the swim cap provided by the race as it is used to help organize the participants into the appropriate waves. If you are allergic to latex, please notify a race official that you are unable to wear the cap so that you won’t be penalized.

  • Will wet suits be allowed on the swim?

    It depends on the water temperature at the venue. Established rules will be followed. If the water temperature is 78 F or below, wetsuits will be allowed. Between 78 F and 84 F, wetsuit use is permitted; however, athletes wearing them will start in a separate wave and will not be eligible for awards or rankings. Above 84 F, wetsuit use is prohibited

  • What is the swim start like?

    If you start with the pack, be prepared for being kicked and poked during the initial minutes, plus you will be doing it to others. If you want to avoid that experience and aren’t particular about your swim time, simply let the pack start ahead of you or start out on the outer edges of the pack.

  • How do I sight the swim buoys?

    Ideally you sight as part of your swim stroke by rolling your eyes forward every few strokes. How often you sight depends largely on how straight you swim. You can also simply follow someone that you have determined is sighting well.

  • What is it like to swim in open water?

    The biggest difference between swimming in open water and training in a pool is that there are no lane lines! And there is no side to hang on to if you get tired. Some open water courses are out-and-back, and others look more like a loop. Either way, the course is marked with buoys. It is important to sight (look up and see where you are) every so often so you swim fairly straight. The wave start can be tricky - if you're uncomfortable being shoulder-to-shoulder with 40 or 70 other people, just count to 10 or 20 when the bullhorn sounds and let everyone else get out on the course. Or stay to the outside of the pack. Most triathlons will have safety canoes and kayaks out on the water, along with lifeguards. If you ever feel like you're having trouble during the swim, just wave your hands and a rescue boat will be at your side soon. Open water swimming can sometimes be wavy or choppy, depending on weather conditions.

  • Can I use a snorkel?

    Actually, yes. Since it does not propel you forward, the use of a snorkel is allowed under rules.

  • Can I use swim fins on my feet?

    No, that would be an unfair advantage.

  • Can I use any stroke in the swim portion?

    You may use any stroke that allows you to see the buoys and stay on course.

  • If I hang onto the lane lines or buoys, will I be disqualified for doing so?

    You may stop and rest during the swim, but you must not interfere with the progress of other swimmers. You may hang onto the guard boats or buoys.

  • What additional equipment will be permitted in the swim?

    Aqua socks, socks, snorkels and swim mask or goggles will be allowed in the swim leg of the Event. Use of fins, gloves and flotation devices is prohibited.

  • How is my wave assigned?

    Waves are assigned according to division, gender, and age group.

  • Can I switch my wave?

    Wave assignments cannot be changed except under special circumstances and a time penalty is given for starting in the wrong wave.

  • How many people will be in my wave?

    Wave numbers are approximate and are assigned to facilitate timing and ensure accuracy and safety. The maximum is 150, but waves can be as small as 50.

  • How many minutes are between waves?

    There are 3-5 minutes between waves.

  • What time does my wave start?

    Wave start times will be posted at packet pickup.

  • If I need help in the swim what do I do?

    There will be plenty of lifeguards on duty. Take your brightly colored swim cap off and wave it in the air to summon help.

  • What if I can not finish the swim? Can I finish the race?

    Yes, you may finish the race but you will be disqualified for not finishing the entire course. Please report yourself to the timing trailer immediately after finishing the race.

  • How do I know where to swim?

    The swim will be marked with buoys in the water. If it is an ocean swim you usually swim with the current.

  • If someone hands me my glasses at the end of the swim, does that violate the "No Help" rule?

    No, but they will not be allowed in the swim exit chute and will have to stand behind the fence lining the start or the run to transition.

  • How is the water in the lake? Will I be able to see? Is it clear?

    The amount of visibility depends on the venue. Visit the venue prior to the race to get a good feel for the visibility in that particular race’s body of water. Most venues don’t have a lot of visibility and/or they are too deep to see much.

  • What is the water temperature?

    Click here to see the average water and air temperatures by month in South Florida.

  • What about amoebas?

    Amoebas have not been an issue in South Florida, but if you have any concerns you can simply wear a nose clip to eliminate any possibility of them entering your nose. They are only a problem in very, very warm, stagnant, and generally shallow water and must get very deep up your nose to latch on. That is generally only achieved if you go upside down under water and suck in through the nose. 

Wetsuits

  • Do I need a wetsuit?

    Not necessarily.  Throughout most of the year the waters of South Florida are too warm for wetsuits to even be allowed. Some early and late season races, like Miami Man, are wetsuit legal, most of the time.  If that is your primary race, it could be a good investment as it will improve your swim split time. If you intend on traveling to races in colder climates, you may need one as well.

  • I don't have a wetsuit; I can't really afford to have one. Will I be at a disadvantage?

    A wetsuit can certainly improve your swim time, but will hurt your transition time as you have to get the wetsuit off. Most of our races are sprints with only a ¼ mile swim, so the time gained in the water is minimal, with the gains usually completely offset by the time lost in transition. A wetsuit is certainly an overall gain in Olympic and Half Iron distance events.

  • Will a lot of people wear wet suits?

    The water will be too warm for wetsuits to be allowed most of the triathlon season in S. Florida, so most local triathletes don’t own one or use them, even in races where they are allowed.

  • Should I purchase a full or sleeveless wetsuit?

    Many people will purchase a sleeveless suit if they are new to triathlon as a sleeveless will be lower in price. The benefits of a full suit include an increase in buoyancy as more of your body is covered in neoprene, less drag due to a tighter seal around your wrist than shoulder/ arm, and the ability to swim comfortably in colder temperatures. Some people are worried about overheating in a full suit. This should not be a concern. If the water temperature is above 78° wetsuits will not be allowed. Very experienced swimmers or those with larger back or shoulder muscles may prefer a sleeveless suit, but the majority of triathletes will be faster in a full suit. 

  • What should I look for in the fit of a wetsuit?

    Wetsuits are sized on a height to weight ratio. However, not all of our body types fit into the convenient sizing chart. You want the suit to fit as snug as possible without being constrictive. Suits will conform to your body after swimming in them a time or two. They usually feel too tight when trying them on but buying a suit that is too large is the biggest mistake. Any extra room in the suit will allow water in and create drag. If possible try on suits for comparison. Women will want to be sure to purchase a women’s specific suit. For those will less typical body proportions try the Desoto two-piece suits.

  • Are there any other considerations?

    Almost all wetsuit manufacturers have a couple different grades of neoprene, which doesn't affect durability but does drastically affect the fit and function. A more expensive suit will be made of a more flexible neoprene, which will help the suit go on and off more smoothly. The expensive suit will also have more pieces, contributing to a more tailored fit and range of motion. The best thing to do is try on several suits from several different manufacturers to find the best possible fit. That way you will know why you selected a less expensive suit or opted for a more expensive one.

  • How deep is the lake?

    That depends on the venue. Call the park that is listed on the race information page to get specifics about their particular lake.

  • How many lifeguards will there be?

    Regulations call for 1 lifeguard per 35 athletes for ocean swims and 1 lifeguard per 50 athletes for lake swims. The number of athletes is based on the number in the water at the same time, not the total number that are registered. All MultiRace events exceed these requirements as we also take into account the length of the swim. We always want a lifeguard to be close enough to every part of the swim to react quickly, though extra coverage is provided near the beginning, where almost all problems occur.

Bike

  • Do I need to buy an expensive triathlon bike?

    Almost anything with two wheels in your garage (no recumbent, no engines) can get you started at no extra cost. You’ll certainly catch the triathlon flu though and likely be rushing out to get a bike that’ll help cut some time off your bike split.

  • Will a new bike make me faster?

    The engine is the most important part of the bike, and that’s you. If you aren’t in shape, the bike isn’t going to help that much. With that being said, as you get the engine going, you want to start to give it some help by getting more aerodynamic. Bike fit is priority #1 as the best bike not set up properly will be of no help. Bike fit will make you more aerodynamic AND more powerful. Consult the closest MultiRace bike shop sponsor to get your fit just right as they are experts in bike fitting.

    After the engine and the fit come the bike components. Buy for aerodynamics, not weight, unless you are traveling to the mountains to race. It is flat as a pancake here, so weight is just sexy, not really functional. Aerodynamics are priority #1 when it comes to the bike and components. A aerodynamic bike with entry level componentry starts around $2000. You can get aerodynamic and super lightweight, but expect to spend $5000+.

  • What about those disk wheels some triathletes use?

    Disks are primarily for fast and experienced riders. They catch a lot of wind and make cornering harder. They make you more aerodynamic, but the benefit is primarily at higher speeds (like every other aerodynamic part). Consider getting a disk, for racing only, once you can hold at least 22-23 mph in a time trial and are very adept at handling your bike. A deep dish aero wheel on the front is actually more beneficial than a disk on the back as it is the wheel that cuts the wind, and it doesn’t affect your bike handling nearly as much. Put a matching wheel on the back and it is almost as good as a disk. Almost.

  • Do I have to get my bike inspected?

    No, but it is highly recommended. Many people experience technical problems on race day that could have been easily avoided if the bike had been inspected prior to the race. In order to avoid disappointment on race day we urge all competitors to have their bikes inspected no more than 3 weeks prior to the event. Please contact the closest MultiRace bike shop sponsor and they’ll be happy to go over your ride to make sure that you are race ready.

  • Are there specifications for the bike, helmets, and wetsuits?

    Yes, the bike helmet must be CPSC certified. Most helmets purchased in the US within the last 2-3 years are certified. Please confirm this by checking for a sticker indicating its certification on the inside of the helmet. The wetsuit must not be over 5mm at its thickest point. Anyone using a wetsuit should have used their wetsuit in their training. If the water temperature is 78 degrees or less, wetsuits are allowed.

  • What is the difference between a road bike and tri bike?

    The most obvious difference in a bike for triathlon and a standard road bike is the addition of aero bars. A set of clip-on aero bars can be added to any bike, but requires changing the "fit" of the bike to be an advantage. You then have the option of adding bar end shifters or sticking with traditional STI Levers. Aero bars, coupled with a good aero fit, will give you a more aerodynamic position and other options for body positioning… enhanced comfort over a long period of time.

    The most valuable difference in a tri specific bike is a steeper seat tube angle. This puts your body in a more forward position, which saves your hamstrings for the running portion of the race. A steeper seat tube angle will better accommodate the addition of aero bars.

    The most important piece of "speed work" for a triathlete would be the addition of aero wheels. You will also enhance your cycling pleasure and triathlon performance by having a good bike fit.

    MultiRace has several bike partners that can help you with your bike choices. 

  • When can I retrieve my bike?

    Once all competitors have finished the bike course and started the run, the transition area reopens for bike retrieval.

  • Are disk wheels allowed?

    Yes. 

  • I have a mountain bike -- is it OK to ride that?

    Absolutely! There are lots of triathletes who ride mountain bikes. Bear in mind that if you plan to compete regularly, or are looking at competing in races longer than Sprint distance, you should probably think of investing in a road bike or tri bike.

  • Why is bike fit so important?

    Injury prevention, aerodynamics, and power are all factors. It is important that you can adjust your seat so that there is only a slight bend in your knee when your foot and pedal are at the 6 o'clock position. It is also important that you are able to stop and get off your bike without injuring yourself. Bikes come in all sizes, and the seat post can be adjusted somewhat to make sure the height of your bike is correct for you. But besides the height, there are other important factors to consider, for example: does your seat need to be adjusted forward or back? Is your seat level? Are the handlebars too far away or too close? If your bike is not fitted properly for you, you risk serious injury after prolonged riding. Take your bike in to a local bike shop and have them take a look for you.

  • What happens to my bike while I'm swimming?

    Your bike will be set up on one of many bike racks in the transition zone. Our transition areas are organized by race number so you know where to rack your bike.

  • Are Recumbent bikes allowed?

    No. 

  • Can someone else check in my bike for me?

    NO. Bikes must be checked in be the athlete.

  • Do you have to wear a helmet?

    Absolutely! You must wear your helmet anytime that you are on your bike and at the race site. This includes before and after the race. If you are seen riding your bike without a helmet at any time, you will be disqualified from the race.

  • How do you put the bike number on the bike?

    Remove the bike number from the sticker.  Locate the top tube and use it to fold the sticker over itself to where the number can be read from both the left and right side of the bike.

  • Do you have to wear the helmet number?

    Yes, on the front of your helmet.

Run

  • What will be given at the water stations?

    Sprint races have just water at the water stations and only have stations on the run course.  Olympic distance events also only have stations on the run course, but also give out sports drink and hammer gel at each station.  Half Iron events have aid stations on the bike too that contain water, sports drink, Hammer Gel, Clif Bars, and bananas.   Half Iron run aid stations contain all of that plus oranges and usually some other items

Transition Area

  • Is there a separate run and bike transition?

    No, there is only 1 transition area. It is generally set up so that you run in and out on one side and bike in and out on the other side, though occasionally it is set up so you run and bike in on one side and run and bike out on the other side.

  • How far is transition from the swim?

    That depends on the venue. At some venues it is as close as 50 feet and others it can be as far as a ¼ mile. Check the swim course map for each venue for the specifics for that venue.

  • Do you come out the same way as you come in the swim?

    That depends on the venue. Most of our venues have swims that start and end at completely different locations, however some have the start and exit right next to each other. Check the swim course map for each venue for the specifics for that venue.

  • When will I be able to access the transition area?

    Once all competitors have finished the bike course and started the run, the transition area reopens for bike retrieval.

  • Why do I have to be in the transition area so early if my wave doesn’t start until later in the morning?

    The transition area closes at the specified times regardless of what wave you are in. All equipment must be in by the appropriate time. In order to ensure the security and safety of our competitors and their equipment, there will be absolutely no exceptions to this rule.

  • Can I use decorations (balloons, etc.) to indicate where my things are in the transition area?

    Yes, but they should not interfere with anyone else being able to easily and safely access their equipment. We reserve the right to remove any materials that will interfere with the safety and security of our competitors and their equipment.

  • What time will the transition area re-open?

    The exact time is to be determined by the Race Director and is dependent on when the last competitor completes the bike course and has set out on the run. We will not be responsible for any equipment not claimed.

  • How do I set-up my transition area?

    Your race number will determine which rack you must use to set up your bike and gear. If you get there early enough, setting up at the ends of the rack is usually easier to manage during the race. Bring a towel to mark off your transition area. Then simply visualize what will be easiest set-up for you to get your bike stuff on after the swim and the run stuff on after the bike. Ideas: place your bike helmet with straps open on the handle bars, set up bike shoes/socks and running shoes in order that you will need them, and use a race belt to carry your race number for the run.

  • How do find my transition area during the race?

    As part of your pre-race routine, you will have to determine the established gates into and out of the transition area for the swim, bike and run portions. Know exactly where your bike and transition area is set up (number of racks from the end, how many spots in, by a tree, etc.) and then rehearse finding your area from the swim entrance and bike entrance. Toward the end of your swim and bike portions, think about where you are going to go once you get to the transition area. Some triathletes assist this process by using distinctive markers (towels, balloons, signs, etc.) to make it easier to find.

  • When do I check my gear in?

    On race morning for all races except Miami Man, which requires that all competitors check their bike in on Saturday at the race expo. 

  • Will my bike and equipment be safe in the transition area until I am able to retrieve it?

    Yes. Security will be stationed at the transition area.

  • Are there changing tents in the Transition area?

    No. 

  • What time does transition open race morning?

    1.5 hours before the start of the first wave. 

Timing and Results

  • When are results posted?

    Preliminary results are posted soon after athletes begin to finish. Results are then updated continuously throughout the race. Results are not official until all penalties have been assessed. Once the penalties have been received, official results are posted and the awards ceremony starts shortly thereafter.

  • Are the results posted on the web?

    Yes, results will be available for viewing on www.MultiRace.com following the race. Results are usually posted within a few minutes after the conclusion of the race.

  • I placed within my division but have to leave before the scheduled awards ceremony. What should I do?

    We encourage you to find a way to stick around and enjoy the post event festivities. If you absolutely, positively must leave before the award ceremony starts, you can have your award mailed to you by clicking on the Mail hyperlink under the Awards column in the online race results. All awards must be claimed within 14 days of the race. 

  • What is a timing chip?

    A timing chip is a tiny computer transponder that you wear during the race for scoring purposes. If you do not wear the chip assigned to you, you will not be scored in the race.

  • Do I need to rent a timing chip for the race?

    Timing chips are provided for all participants in the event. There is no charge for the chip unless you fail to return it following the race. The cost to replace the chip is $70. In most cases, the chips are distributed on race morning.

  • How does it work?

    Each chip has a built in unique code that is sent to the scoring line when it crosses over it. The scoring line records the GPS time (using GPS receivers) of the crossing and the code of the chip and sends that data over the network to the scoring computer. MultiRace’s scoring computer then uses proprietary software to turn all of those passing times into your race results. 

  • What happens if I lose the timing chip?

    You are responsible for the timing chip and band. If you lose it, or do not return it to a volunteer at the finish line only following the race, you will be billed for the replacement cost of the chip and band ($70). You may return it to: MultiRace, 4081 SW 47th Ave, #7, Davie, FL 33314

  • I'm on a Relay Team, who wears the timing chip?

    Each member of the team wears the chip during his/her segment of the race. The members will transfer the chip from one team member to another in a designated area within the transition area.

  • What do I do if I lose my timing chip during the race?

    Notify the volunteers at the finish line so they can manually record your time.

  • Where do I put the chip?

    The timing chip is attached to an ankle bracelet that must be worn around your left ankle (to avoid getting caught in your bike chain) during the entire race. If the timing chip is not affixed to your ankle, you will not be scored.

  • Can I put the timing chip on my own ankle bracelet?

    No. If you return the chip without it’s band, you will be billed $5 for the replacement cost of the band.

  • Can I race with my own timing chip?

    No. Most people that own a chip own a proprietary ChampionChip. Those chips are not compatible with our timing lines.

  • I didn't turn in my timing chip after the race. Where do I return it so I won't be charged the "lost chip" fee?

    MultiRace, 4081 SW 47th Ave, #7, Davie, FL 33314

  • What is the timing system used for the event?

    IPICO

USA triathlon